Oaktopia

Tree Blog

New Mexico

This tree was found growing with disjunct-range Chinkapin Oaks. It is quite hard to say exactly what it is. There are hints of Q. gambelii, Q. macrocarpa and Q. muehlenbergii, though none of them are dominant, and no Q. gambelii or Q. macrocarpa were seen in the area where it was discovered. This is just another example of how nature, through oak genetics, creates diversity. Nature creates diversity, while people run along behind trying to fit an infinite variety into a finite number of categories. Horticulturists are often divided into "lumpers" and "splitters", with obvious meanings to each. Hard to know what a lumper might call this tree.

Dave Muffly